Number of realizations

19

to conjure

to charm, to delight

Realization
Type Polysemy
Language Ancient Greek
Lexeme θέλγω
Meaning 1 to enchant, be witch; to produce by spells θαῦμα μ᾽ ἔχει, ὡς οὔτι, πιὼν τάδε φάρμακ᾽, ἐθέλχθης
"I am amazed that the spell did not work on you after havink drunk this potion"
Direction
Meaning 2 metaph., to charm, beguile
Reference LSJ
Related Languages
Comment
Realization
Type Polysemy
Language Modern Greek
Lexeme γητεύω
Meaning 1 to bewitch
Direction
Meaning 2 to charm
Reference Xorikov Malev 1993 page 213 224
Related Languages
Comment Also γοητεύω in both meanings
Realization
Type Polysemy
Language Icelandic
Lexeme töfra
Meaning 1 to bewitch Álfkonan töfraði hann til sín í klettinn
"The witch used a spell to make him enter her mountain"
Direction
Meaning 2 to charm, to captivate Náttúrufegurðin töfrar flesta sem koma í eyjarnar
"Most people who come to the islands are charmed by the beautiful nature"
Reference Berkov et al. 1962
Related Languages
Comment
Realization
Type Polysemy
Language Romanian
Lexeme farmec
Meaning 1 witchery a face farmece
"to put a spell on smn."
Direction
Meaning 2 charm a avea farmec
"to be nice, charming"
Reference DRRS
Related Languages
Comment DRRS 1, 823-824. From the Greek. φάρμακον DER 321. Also the verb a fermeca DRRS 1, 839
Realization
Type Polysemy
Language English
Lexeme glamour
Meaning 1 enchantment; magic the glamour of Monte Carlo, pile hair up for evening glamour
Direction
Meaning 2 an attractive or exciting quality that makes certain people or things seem appealing that maiden, made by glamour out of flowers
Reference OED
Related Languages
Comment from Scottish glamer 'magic, enchantment', a variant of Scottish gramarye 'magic, enchantment, spell. Alteration of English grammar in a specialized use of that word's medieval sense of "any sort of scholarship, especially occult learning," the latter sense attested from c. 1500 in English. Scottish gramarye from French gramaire, from Latin grammatica and Ancient Greek γραμματικός. Scottish word was popularized in English by the writings of Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832). Sense of "magical beauty, alluring charm" first recorded 1840. As that quality of attractiveness especially associated with Hollywood, high-fashion, celebrity, etc., by 1939 [Harper's Etymonline], Scottish glamer, from earlier gramarye ; the Latin word grammatica (from which it derives) was often used in the Middle Ages to mean ‘scholarship, learning’, including the occult practices popularly associated with learning [OED]. alternative etymology connects Scottish word with Old Norse glámr poet. 'moon', name of a ghost, glámsýni 'glamour, illusion', literally “glam-sight”) [Zoëga 1910] probably from the same root as English gleam.
Realization
Type Polysemy
Language German
Lexeme bezaubern
Meaning 1 to put a spell, to bewitch
Direction
Meaning 2 to charm, to captivate
Reference Moskal'skaja (ed.) 2001
Related Languages
Comment
Realization
Type Polysemy
Language Spanish
Lexeme fascinar
Meaning 1 to put a jinx on
Direction
Meaning 2 to charm, to captivate
Reference Narumov 1995 page 365
Related Languages
Comment From Latin fastino, fastinare 'enchant, bewitch, charm, fascinate'
Realization
Type Polysemy
Language Spanish
Lexeme encantar
Meaning 1 to bewitch
Direction
Meaning 2 to delight, to charm
Reference Narumov 1995 page 320
Related Languages Italain incantare, French enchanter.
Comment from Latin incantāre
Realization
Type Polysemy
Language French
Lexeme charmer
Meaning 1 to bewitch charmer les serpents
"to charm snakes"
Direction
Meaning 2 to charm, to delight charmer l'esprit de quelqu'un
"to charm someone's mind"
Reference CNRTL
Related Languages
Comment Old French charme 'chant, magic spell' from Latin carmen 'song'
Realization
Type Derivation
Language Russian
Lexeme 1 чары (čary)
Lexeme 2 очаровать (očarovat')
Meaning 1 spell
Direction
Meaning 2 to charm
Reference Fasmer 1986 page 4 317
Related Languages
Comment cf. also околдовать, заворожить 'to charm, to put a spell on' meaning 'to attract'
Realization
Type Polysemy
Language Spanish
Lexeme hechizar
Meaning 1 to bewitch
Direction
Meaning 2 to charm, to captivate
Reference Narumov 1995 page 407
Related Languages
Comment From hacer 'to make' (Latin facere) > hechizo (Latin factīcius) 'artificial', 'feigned, false', from this substantive 'artifact that is used in witchcraft'(the same evolution in Portuguese feitiço → French fétiche, English fetish) [Corominas, Pascual 1984, 3, 298-299]. Also Spanish hechicería, hechizo 'magic' and 'charm', hechicero, hechizador 'magician' and 'seduser'.
Realization
Type Polysemy
Language English
Lexeme enchant
Meaning 1 to put (someone or something) under a spell The princess had been enchanted by a magician to sleep for a hundred years
"The princess had been enchanted by a magician to sleep for a hundred years"
Direction
Meaning 2 to fill (someone) with great delight; charmfill (someone) with great delight; charm The teacher was enchanted by the little girl sweet voice.
"The teacher was enchanted by the little girl sweet voice."
Reference OED
Related Languages
Comment Borrowed from French in both meanings.
Realization
Type Polysemy
Language Armenian
Lexeme hmayel (հմայել)
Meaning 1 to put a spell, to bewitch
Direction
Meaning 2 to charm, to captivate
Reference Galstjan 1984 page 419
Related Languages Borrowed from Iranian. Compare Middle Persian hwmʾy, humāy 'a bird of good omen', Avestan humaiia, humāiia 'blessed', Sanskrit su-māyá 'having excellent counsels or plans, very wise', Persian‎ humāyūn 'blessed, lucky'. All composed of *māyā- 'blessing, happiness' and the prefix *hu- 'good'.
Comment hmaykʿ (հմայք) 'wizard, magician', 'charm, fascination'
Realization
Type Cognates
Language 1 Middle Persian (Pahlavi)
Language 2 Osetin
Lexeme 1 warz
Lexeme 2 warzyn
Meaning 1 spell
Direction
Meaning 2 to love
Reference Abaev page 4 53-54
Related Languages
Comment
Realization
Type Semantic evolution
Language 1 Latin
Language 2 French
Lexeme 1 fascinare
Lexeme 2 fasciner
Meaning 1 to bewitch
Direction
Meaning 2 to charm, to captivate
Reference CNRTL
Related Languages Romanian a fascina (from French) 'to charm' DRRS 1, 824.
Comment
Realization
Type Semantic evolution
Language Norwegian
Lexeme fortrylle
Meaning 1 to practise witchcraft
Direction
Meaning 2 to fascinate hun fortryllet alle i salen
"she charmed everyone in the hall"
Reference BO
Related Languages
Comment
Realization
Type Polysemy
Language Danish
Lexeme fortrylle
Meaning 1 to practise witchcraft
Direction
Meaning 2 to charm, to delight
Reference DDO
Related Languages
Comment
Realization
Type Polysemy
Language Spanish
Lexeme brujo
Meaning 1 wizard, magician
Direction
Meaning 2 charming, fascinating
Reference Narumov 1995
Related Languages
Comment bruja 'witch, sorceress'. Possibly from Celtiberian *bruxtia (compare Catalan bruixa, Portuguese bruxa, Occitan bruèissa), from Proto-Celtic *brixtā 'spell, magic' (Old Irish bricht 'charm', Old Breton brith 'magic')
Realization
Type Polysemy
Language Armenian
Lexeme kaxardel (կախարդել)
Meaning 1 to conjure
Direction
Meaning 2 to charm, to delight
Reference Galstjan 1984 page 330-331
Related Languages
Comment From kaxard (կախարդ ) 'sorcerer, wizard, witch, magician'. Compare Avestan kaxᵛarəδa 'wizard'